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William Warmus Lecture: From Benaroya to Art Basel
January 19, 2019 @ 3:00 pm4:00 pm

Award-winning curator, historian, and editor  William Warmus joins us to speak about the history of glass art in the Northwest. From 20th century studio glass to the remarkable developments in contemporary glass art, Warmus will be be reviewing the highlights of glass art and the significance of the Benaroya wing to the studio glass community.

Please reserve your seat here.

More about William Warmus

Photo courtesy of Mary Van Cline.

William Warmus is a Fellow and former curator at The Corning Museum of Glass. The son of a glassblower at Corning Incorporated, he studied with art critic Harold Rosenberg and philosopher Paul Ricoeur while at the University of Chicago.

Warmus became the curator of modern glass at The Corning Museum of Glass in 1978, and curated three landmark exhibitions: New Glass, which was also shown at The Metropolitan Museum of Art and at the Louvre; Tiffany’s Tiffany, which focused on the masterpieces Tiffany had in his home and studios; and the first major exhibition in North America of Emile Gallé’s work. He is the founding editor of the New Glass Review.

Since leaving the Museum, Warmus has pursued a career as an independent curator, historian, and appraiser, specializing in modern glass, abstract art, and the aesthetics of the natural environment. The New York Times profiled him as a “Stylemaker,” while the University of Chicago magazine described him as a classical modernist. He is the author or co-author of more than 15 books, including biographies of Tiffany, Lalique, and Chihuly.

Warmus was the editor of Glass Magazine, faculty member and visiting artist at the Pilchuck School of Glass, executive secretary of the Glass Art Society and board member at Urban Glass. He is the recipient of the AACG award for outstanding contributions to contemporary glass. Warmus lives near Ithaca, N.Y.

Warmus is a featured speaker at the 57th Annual Seminar on Glass at The Corning Museum of Glass.