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Lessons Learned: Never Throw Away an Old Box without Looking Inside

The catalogue card that led to four mysterious boxes read simply “Delivery—Forest Service from Washington D.C. 1952.”  Inside them was a remarkable discovery, one of many that has made the exhibition Forgotten Stories: Northwest Public Art of the 1930s possible. During the Great Depression of the 1930s, the U.S. government created the New Deal: a … Continue reading Lessons Learned: Never Throw Away an Old Box without Looking Inside

Object of the Week – Baby Face

“I consider myself an African-American Feminist and environmental artist. My approach to producing art is environmentally and politically infused: neither waste humanity nor the gifts of nature. I am primarily a mixed media sculptor who uses discarded materials. My art draws upon relics from the African Diaspora. The discarded materials represent how people of African … Continue reading Object of the Week – Baby Face

Object of the Week – Man Cleaning His Fish II

Seattle-based artist Barbara Earl Thomas weaves order into the chaotic natural world in order to tell stories. Drawing from history, literature, folklore, biblical stories and her surrounding communities, Thomas’ work explores and addresses major contemporary social issues ranging from the violence against black men and youth to gun violence and the climate crisis. Reflecting on … Continue reading Object of the Week – Man Cleaning His Fish II

Object of the Week – Self Portrait (1969)

Milton Simons was an important Northwest African American artist from the 1940s until his death in 1973. In addition to his skills as a painter, Simons was an educator, poet, dancer, and noted musician/composer. Born and raised in Seattle, Washington, Simons’ work reflected his varied cultural backgrounds. As a young adult he won a national … Continue reading Object of the Week – Self Portrait (1969)

Object of the Week – Untitled (Woman and Daughter with Make-up)

“Photography can be used as a powerful weapon toward instituting political and cultural change.” – Carrie Mae Weems   Working at the intersection of art and politics, visual artist Carrie Mae Weems investigates family relationships, cultural identity, sexism, class, political systems, and the consequences of power for over thirty years through a complex body of … Continue reading Object of the Week – Untitled (Woman and Daughter with Make-up)

TAM to Receive $15,000 Grant from the National Endowment for the Arts

Tacoma Art Museum (TAM) has been approved for a $15,000 National Endowment for the Arts Art Works grant to support the annual Día de los Muertos Festival. This funding will support TAM with expanding the Festival, Tacoma’s largest celebration of Latino arts and culture. Overall, the NEA has approved 1,187 grants totaling $27.3 million in … Continue reading TAM to Receive $15,000 Grant from the National Endowment for the Arts

Object of the Week – Buffalo Horse Medicine

The Apsáalooke people have enduring relationships with horses. Paraded at the annual Crow Fair Celebration and other special events, horses adorned in beaded regalia demonstrate their value and importance to the Apsáalooke people. In Buffalo Horse Medicine Apsáalooke artist Kevin Red Star depicts horses that are an important breed for buffalo hunting. Red Star signifies … Continue reading Object of the Week – Buffalo Horse Medicine