Tag Archives: Object of the Week

Object of the Week – Untitled white and pink vessel

Sonja Blomdahl has been working in glass for over forty years. Her vessels are based on classical traditional forms, symmetrical in shape with clean, spare lines. A specialist in the incalmo, or double bubble, glassblowing technique, she layers different colors of glass to create rich hues that shift in intensity as light moves through them. … Continue reading Object of the Week – Untitled white and pink vessel

Object of the Week – Reconstruction of Pluto and Persephone

In ancient Greek mythology, Persephone was the goddess of vegetation and was abducted by Hades, the ruler of the underworld. Ancient Romans adopted her cult. In this work, Nancy Mee takes the Greek and Roman myths and uses them to examine contemporary ideas regarding feminine beauty. Transferring photographs of the Baroque sculpture of the abduction … Continue reading Object of the Week – Reconstruction of Pluto and Persephone

Object of the Week: Greengage Plum

Joey Kirkpatrick and Flora C. Mace developed their now widely recognizable large fruit sculptures to reflect ideas of abundance, nature, and the rhythm of life.  “We needed a symbol; we needed a symbol of the fulfillment of life and the expected year-in-and-year-out of that symbol,” said Mace in an interview with Lloyd E. Herman for the … Continue reading Object of the Week: Greengage Plum

Object of the Week – Baby Face

“I consider myself an African-American Feminist and environmental artist. My approach to producing art is environmentally and politically infused: neither waste humanity nor the gifts of nature. I am primarily a mixed media sculptor who uses discarded materials. My art draws upon relics from the African Diaspora. The discarded materials represent how people of African … Continue reading Object of the Week – Baby Face

Object of the Week – Man Cleaning His Fish II

Seattle-based artist Barbara Earl Thomas weaves order into the chaotic natural world in order to tell stories. Drawing from history, literature, folklore, biblical stories and her surrounding communities, Thomas’ work explores and addresses major contemporary social issues ranging from the violence against black men and youth to gun violence and the climate crisis. Reflecting on … Continue reading Object of the Week – Man Cleaning His Fish II

Object of the Week – Self Portrait (1969)

Milton Simons was an important Northwest African American artist from the 1940s until his death in 1973. In addition to his skills as a painter, Simons was an educator, poet, dancer, and noted musician/composer. Born and raised in Seattle, Washington, Simons’ work reflected his varied cultural backgrounds. As a young adult he won a national … Continue reading Object of the Week – Self Portrait (1969)

Object of the Week – Untitled (Woman and Daughter with Make-up)

“Photography can be used as a powerful weapon toward instituting political and cultural change.” – Carrie Mae Weems   Working at the intersection of art and politics, visual artist Carrie Mae Weems investigates family relationships, cultural identity, sexism, class, political systems, and the consequences of power for over thirty years through a complex body of … Continue reading Object of the Week – Untitled (Woman and Daughter with Make-up)

Object of the Week – Buffalo Horse Medicine

The Apsáalooke people have enduring relationships with horses. Paraded at the annual Crow Fair Celebration and other special events, horses adorned in beaded regalia demonstrate their value and importance to the Apsáalooke people. In Buffalo Horse Medicine Apsáalooke artist Kevin Red Star depicts horses that are an important breed for buffalo hunting. Red Star signifies … Continue reading Object of the Week – Buffalo Horse Medicine

Object of the Week – Shepherdess and Sheep

  When thinking about French landscapes, the vivid colors and rich textures used by Impressionists (1870-1890) are usually the first that come to mind.  These artists, however, were not the first to experiment and break out of the rigid French approach to landscape in the nineteenth century. Eclipsed in popularity by their successors, artists of … Continue reading Object of the Week – Shepherdess and Sheep